16 May 2011

Off Side - Match of the Day/ Small Deal

Off Side - Match of the Day

Label: Pye International
Year of Release: 1970

Since its introduction in 1970, the "Match of the Day" theme on the BBC has become one of the most instantly recognisable television themes in Britain - if not, according to the Performing Rights Society, the most recognisable.  More suggestive and indicative than any news broadcast theme (even the BBC World News channel's bleeping ambient effort) or even the wailing harmonica of "Last of the Summer Wine", some of us were born with this theme and know, within the first few milliseconds of the first note, what it's representing. 

Trying to listen to it with a fresh pair of 2011 ears strapped firmly to my aging head, it does seem a strange choice for a tune despite its endearing familiarity, and I'm clearly not alone in thinking that - my Canadian wife when she first heard it burst out laughing at the absurdity of a celebratory Herb Alpert styled quasi-Mexican ditty introducing a modern British football programme.  Clearly at the time of commissioning the piece had South American connotations which seemed entirely synonymous with the big game, but there's definitely something a little unlike Auntie Beeb about the whole thing.  However, I for one am happy about the fact that it's what we've got - it's a happy, chirpy clarion call which you can imagine beckoning members of any British family in from their bedrooms, kitchens and even bathrooms, like some soccer orientated Pied Piper of Hamlet with, er... a football for a head. 

Whatever your personal feelings on the piece, it's one of the few television themes which has wormed its way so much into the British psyche that it conjours up memories and emotions from even the the most steely hearted football fan.  As Paul Whitehouse once observed on an episode of "The Fast Show" in the guise of Ron Manager - "Match of the Day?  Da da da da da-da-da-da da?  Somehow comforting, isn't it, you know?"  In summary, then - do I expect any non-British reader to really get the appeal of this record?  No, not really.  In the absence of any context at all, it probably sounds like a cheery piece of easy listening and not much more (and I'd be really curious to read your thoughts on it if it's unfamiliar to you, actually). 

The single you can hear below isn't, of course, the original theme commissioned by the BBC but a very close and crafty approximation recorded by Mike Vickers for the benefit of Pye Records.  It wasn't a hit, but in recent years has become a massive collector's item purely due to the B-side, a Vickers-penned piece called "Small Deal", which has apparently become popular with DJs who are keen on the "funky loops" it offers.  To my ears, "Small Deal" is a dramatic piece of library music which offers nothing especially outstanding, but my DJ'ing chops are definitely not adequate enough to be able to hear what possibilities it might afford.

Mint copies of this frequently go for £20 plus on ebay.  As you can hear, mine isn't exactly mint, but it's good enough, and certainly gives you a fair idea of what's on offer.  Not that, in the case of the A-side, you'd really need telling.


(Sorry for all the horrible typos this entry had when it went live this morning - I've been having a bad week.  Which isn't much of an excuse, but still...)

2 comments:

oliver said...

:-) I can't even imagine the number of times as a kid I would run out of the house and volley a ball into open space while singing this tune:

der der der derr da da da da da

In my mind I was running out of the Stamford Bridge tunnel and onto the pitch

23 Daves said...

In my case, the tune was normally whistled by other children ironically as I veered the ball about 25ft wide of the goalposts. Again.