13 October 2011

Ginger Ale - Sugar Suzy/ Scoobidad


Label: Injection
Year of Release: 1972


Many moons ago, you may remember that I wrote I was due to spend a week's holiday in The Netherlands, and I promised I'd return with some records for this blog. This is the first of the bundle, and whilst it may be a push to describe it as an obscurity - the A-side "Scoobidad" hit number four in Holland - the B-side has since acquired some love as a bit of a psych-pop classic across the whole of Europe.

Ginger Ale were formerly known as Roek's Family before changing their name and subsequently dabbling with more intricate sounds. "Scoobidad" is a fairly harmless piece of seventies bubblegum, but "Sugar Suzy" is beautiful despite its rather unpromising, Archies-esque title. Filled to the brim with twanging, whining guitars and gentle, wistful vocals, it would neither be out of place on the second side of Pink Floyd's "Atom Heart Mother" nor indeed a compilation of West Coast classics. Dreamy, considered and tranquil, it's far too good to be buried away on a flipside, and had it been released at an earlier date and on the right side of a seven inch single (or tucked away on an album) it's not difficult to imagine it gaining more respect than it has done. As it stands, hopefully this will gain further popularity over the coming years.

Ginger Ale eventually went their separate ways, with drummer Richard De Bois moving on to a successful production career, and guitarist Steve Allet going on to join the psych-tastic band Ekseption.



2 comments:

woodythepirate said...

They started as Roek Williams and the Fighting Cats..then shortened to 'Roek's Family'. Very popular on the Dutch offshore stations ( Veronica, later Radio Nordsee, Atlantis etc), they did a version of 'Never An Everyday Thing' in 1969 (which was also a big radio hit, but non-charter for Eli Bonaparte on Decca Records).

23 Daves said...

Thanks for the background, Woody. It certainly explains why there was a British issue of this single (on MAM) if it got pirate play.